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TOPIC: Some lost treasure tales are true

Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 1 month ago #6884

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treasureworks.com/forums/214-treasure-legends/6884-some-lost-treasure-tales-are-true?limit=20&start=320#13644

By Murphy Givens

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS —Probably every place on the Gulf of Mexico from the Florida Keys to the Yucatan Peninsula has its lost treasure legend. Certainly the Texas coast has its own legends, including some that are true and some that are romantic fantasy.

One true story started on April 9, 1554, when a fleet of Spanish galleons set sail from Veracruz for Spain loaded with the plunder of the conquistadors. It was said to be the richest treasure fleet that ever sailed.

When a storm scattered the fleet, several galleons went down, three reached Spain, and one limped back to Veracruz. Three ships — the Santa Maria de Yciar, San Estebán, and Espíritu Santo — wrecked on Padre Island. Three hundred survivors, including soldiers, sailors, priests, women and children, were attacked and killed by Karankawa Indians as they fled down the island. Only two men survived, a Spanish friar and another man who hid at the wrecked ships.

In 1904, Alex Meuly of Corpus Christi claimed he found the remains of one of the Spanish galleons 420 feet from shore, 35 miles down the island. He claimed it held a vast fortune in gold. He built a special trailer to transport the treasure, but for some reason he could never find the ship again.

But ancient and encrusted Spanish doubloons were found so often in one sand dune on the island that it was called Money Hill. Some of the coins were dated 1525. One story told of a man going egg-hunting on the island and returned with his pockets filled with Spanish coins. Another man, an Englishman known as "Buttermilk" Bill, found $4,000 in gold coins near Devil's Elbow.

Many of the treasure tales along our section of the coast are connected to the pirate Jean Lafitte, who was driven from Galvez's Island in 1820 and established two bases in this area, at Cedar Bayou and at the south end of St. Joseph's Island, across the pass from today's Port Aransas. The wife of one of his pirates, a woman known later as "Grandma" Frank, told the story that Lafitte's treasure — more than $500,000 he took away from Galveston — was buried in a mott of live oak trees at False Live Oak Point. After the last of the treasure was buried, and Lafitte came back alone, he supposedly told Mrs. Frank, "There is enough treasure in those woods to ransom a nation."

Other tales say that Lafitte buried his treasure on the Oso, or at the mouth of the Nueces, or at a place later called the Treasure Dunes at Packery Channel. These were all legends passed down through history, with not a shred of factual evidence to support their veracity, though not all the Lafitte stories are so fanciful. After a hurricane hit on June 24, 1880, a Galveston paper reported that a farmer while plowing struck on an old iron pot which held $15,000 in Spanish coins, believed buried by Lafitte or his men.

Another treasure tale from Padre Island has the ring of truth to it, and it may be one where the treasure is still there, waiting to be found.

John Singer and his wife and children were shipwrecked on Padre Island in 1847. They made the most of it and settled down on Padre Balli's old ranch. Singer was the brother of Merritt Singer, who invented the sewing machine. At the beginning of the Civil War, John Singer, knowing they would be suspect as Union sympathizers, planned to vacate the island. He buried anywhere from $60,000 to $80,000 (accounts vary) in gold, silver and jewelry in stone jars between two stunted live oaks. After the war was over, he returned to find that a storm had erased his landmarks. He searched for a long time, but never found his treasure buried in the sands of Padre Island.

Jacob Zeigler, who ran a hotel in Corpus Christi in the 1860s and 1870s, distrusted banks, people said, so he buried $50,000 in gold coins on North Beach and died without revealing the location. For years, people dug around a dense mott of salt cedars on the other side of the bayou on North Beach, looking for Zeigler's gold.

Another tale involves the Mexican revolutionary leader Pancho Villa. In 1955, an aging woman, who had been Villa's nurse, said he ordered saddlebags filled with gold to be buried at Roma, San Antonio, Robstown and Corpus Christi. She gave details about their location, but a former Pancho Villa lieutenant scoffed — "It is infantile to suppose that his money would be buried in the United States. Isn't there enough Mexican soil in which to bury fortunes?"

Let's go back to where we started, with the Spanish treasure fleet of 1554. When news of the disaster reached Mexico, a salvage expedition was mounted, one of the great treasure hunts of all time. Native divers from Yucatan brought up silver and gold from the San Estebán, which was easily found since its masts were above water, and they found the Santa Maria de Yciar and Espíritu Santo by dragging a chain between two ships. The recovered treasure was catalogued and duly sent on to Seville.

Four centuries later, a hurricane uncovered the resting place of one of the ships near the Mansfield cut. In 1967, a salvage firm recovered items from the galleon, including silver and gold coins, a small gold crucifix, cannonballs, astrolabes, even fossilized cockroaches. The state sued the salvage firm and the treasure was obtained by the state. The Texas Antiquities Committee confirmed that three sites 2.8 miles north of the Mansfield cut were the remains of three Spanish galleons of the great treasure fleet wrecked in 1554. What was left of the Santa María de Yciar was destroyed when the Mansfield channel was dredged. The collection from the San Estebán is part of the Shipwreck Exhibit at the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History.

We know that hundreds of years ago Spanish galleons wrecked on the island and, from time to time, gold doubloons have been dug out of the sand dunes of Padre Island. And who knows, maybe the Grandma Frank tale is true and the old pirate Jean Lafitte's treasure was buried somewhere among the trees at False Live Oak Point.

Courtesy Corpus Christi Caller Times
“Treasure – If it’s out there, we’re going to find it!” (Tommy Vawter)
Last Edit: 5 years 5 months ago by wreckdiver.
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 3 weeks ago #7206

  • Kanacki
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Some treasure legends are nothing more than legends other have some truth to them. Sorting out the facts from the fiction is a challenge and a very demanding and frustrating one at that. But it would be fool hardy indeed to write off all treasure legends as fairytales as would beliving every treasure story to be true. Each treasure legend has to be judged on its own merit.

It is the hardest must frustrating treasure hunting of all....

And yet on rare occasions the impossable some times becomes possible.

Kanacki
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 4 days ago #7382

HIO, the Tayopa, La Tarasca, La Gloria pan, Las pimas, Las Perlas de Tecpoca mines are true. As for 'true' treasure tales in Mexico, I have hundreds.

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 4 days ago #7393

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Hello Don Jose de La Mancha

How have you keeping these days? I hope you are well? Have you finalsed a deal with your mines yet? It is always a pleasure to hear from you.

Kanacki
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 3 days ago #7405

Afternoon Kanacki : Time for our coffee break Judy is volunteering to serve it. She is exceptionally generous with the OIRISH booze.

No, but I have a crew looking for the main deposit and a certain female geogist will be checking out the unusual geological conditions which allowed Tayopa to be.

Patience my friend, remember I have been sitting on this since 92, sigh. I ain a getttin any younger sniff.

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 3 days ago #7413

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Sigh......relegated to serving wench again..... :S
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 7 years 1 hour ago #7507

HI Judy, sigh, since you can't make tortillas, can't be merciful to spider families, snore, and like to cruelly & neuter Mules, what else are you good for?

Can you make Pasties? chapatis or even wield a shovel efficiently? How about carrying Gold Bars?

On second thought, around a candle lit dinner you might be useful for filing in the vacant seat and discussing Aardvarks or Zithers?

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 11 months ago #7518

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Don Jose de La Mancha wrote:
HI Judy, sigh, since you can't make tortillas, can't be merciful to spider families, snore, and like to cruelly & neuter Mules, what else are you good for?

Can you make Pasties? chapatis or even wield a shovel efficiently? How about carrying Gold Bars?

On second thought, around a candle lit dinner you might be useful for filing in the vacant seat and discussing Aardvarks or Zithers?

Don Jose de La Mancha


Don't make pasties, nor do I wear them. Just worthless I reckon. ;)

Maybe it's time I head for the beach. I hear it's much easier to shovel sand. B)
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 11 months ago #7520

Hola Judy of the PBSRW@! reference: Being a secluded, innocent, Saintly type, I am lost on your mention of 'wearing' Gypsy Rose Lee pasty thingies???? Can you post a picture of yourself demonstrating them for my edification?? :blush: :blush:

The pasty's that I was referring fo, are triangular Cornish Miner's, meat pies used down in the mines. Very delicious and filling. They take them out of the oven then, while still hot, wrap them in multiple layers of toweling so they are still hot at mid shift.break.

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 11 months ago #7532

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I agree with Kanacki statement. Due to mostly areas being common concrete jungles alot of buried treasures may never be revealed. I know being from New Jersey I been working on alot of Revolutionary war projects and doing research you hit a wall due to areas of where skirmishes and battles took place are now Walmarts or Town houses and cemetaries. 200 years or more of storms and flooding change a areas look and formation.
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10530

Good evening my friends: I am referring to Naranjal,.Like Tayopa, the Lost Dutchman, and many others, it probably is not where popular opinion believes it is, or it would have been found in the past 150 years.

Narnjal ->The Lost El Naranjal, a mine with a gigantic pile of rich gold ore dug from it and stockpiled inside is located in the area of El Naranjo, east of Los Mochis and about 100 miles southwest of the Seven Cities ruins site in the vicinity of the small stream named Evera Mocorito.

Naranjal mine The Naranjal mine (more commonly known as El Naranjal) is the name of a legendary lost gold mine in the Sierra Mountains of Mexico. Folklorist J. Frank Dobie devoted part of his book "Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver" to the story of this legendary lost mine

www.barnesandnoble.com/w/mexican-legends-llc-books/1025313529

El Naranjal, both a hacienda and a gold-mining complex—famed both for gold with a peculiar orange hue and for its groves of tiny, bitter Seville oranges—remains hidden even today, somewhere in the vastness of Yaquiland. Yet occasionally, on the lower end of the Yaqui River in Sonora, one may find rotten Seville oranges that have obviously floated from a long way off.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Actually, all of the basic requirements are fulfilled in the next barranca to the West of Tayopa. A narrow deep canyon, orange colored Gold, worked in the 1800's by a Spaniard, oranges still growing there, actual mine entrance not known, rumors of Gold treasures hidden in difficult, or impossible to reach, caves today. It has all of the requirements to be the elusive Naranjal, except for popular opinion on location, but again that can simply be a need to have the story come true as one version of the legend describes it.


K, for those that wish to look for it, it is under our groups claims, it is protected. However, you will have our permission, with the understanding that - if you find it - and / or it's associated treasure, both you and it, are to be turned over to the group, of which you will automatically become a member and 'share equally'. We will protect you legally on both.

We are concentating on the Tayopa mines.


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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10531

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Don Jose de La Mancha wrote:
K, for those that wish to look for it, it is under our groups claims, it is protected. However, you will have our permission, with the understanding that - if you find it - and / or it's associated treasure, both you and it, are to be turned over to the group, of which you will automatically become a member and 'share equally'. We will protect you legally on both.

Gotta say it. An understanding is worth the paper it's written on. May sound cynical, but there are many on this board who can testify to the worthlessness of a verbal agreement.

BTW, I'd like to see those pasties. also. or Two. :)

:silly:
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10532

G'morning Bill, coffee? Obviously it would be a legal, binding contract between both parties, under Mexican law of course. We have learned to not trust Gringolandia word, and must protect ourselves.. However, they would not share in Tayopa, just in what they may find.

In other words, we give them free reign to look for Naranjal -?- on our property along with information that will place them extremely close to the cave and mine.

We have our available men and resources tied up in Tayopa. and the Escondida mine. What more do you wish ???

As for the Pasties, I feel that I must referr you back to Judy.

I am also opening other properties in the same light, all in ole Mexico., Since I am now 89, I would like to see some good use come of them.

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10534

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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10535

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:laugh: I have to assume that Judy's message is a response to your referral Don Jose! Of course I wouldn't expect a person of her heritage to understand....

Pasties with a soft A are a delicious British food that Judy should check out with Shirley, or if she wants to experience them a short trip to our northern neighbors would no doubt broaden her horizens in that regard, if broadening nothing else.

Delicious even when made in America. My brit grandson Ethan makes them now and again, and they are delicious.

As for Pasties with a long A....... No comment. :blush:

Be well, and have a very prosperous 2013 y'all!
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10536

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Sorry, double posted..
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Last Edit: 6 years 3 months ago by Bill-USA.
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10538

keep yer mnd off of itty bitty pasties ond on mines and mining pasties.

Don Jose de La Mancha
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10539

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Bill-USA wrote:
:laugh: I have to assume that Judy's message is a response to your referral Don Jose! Of course I wouldn't expect a person of her heritage to understand....

Pasties with a soft A are a delicious British food that Judy should check out with Shirley, or if she wants to experience them a short trip to our northern neighbors would no doubt broaden her horizens in that regard, if broadening nothing else.

Delicious even when made in America. My brit grandson Ethan makes them now and again, and they are delicious.

As for Pasties with a long A....... No comment. :blush:

Be well, and have a very prosperous 2013 y'all!


In that case....since you and Don Jose are passing them out....Shirley and I will take a half dozen for the trail. ;)

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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10540

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JudyH wrote:
In that case....since you and Don Jose are passing them out....Shirley and I will take a half dozen for the trail. ;)

Be glad to have a dozen specially commissioned for you Judy, but I won't ship! :)
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Re: Some lost treasure tales are true 6 years 3 months ago #10541

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Don Jose de La Mancha wrote:
keep yer mnd off of itty bitty pasties ond on mines and mining pasties.

Don Jose de La Mancha


Sigh.....slave driver. :S

Then pardon me while I sashay my assay out of the barranca. :P
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