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TOPIC: A little Cherokee Medicine

Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 7 months ago #5438

  • texastee2007
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As with any medicine USE EXTREME CARE! do not mix with over the counter our prescribed medicines as it can be very poisonous. These are only examples of what Native Americans have used for years. Please use with caution. STUDY, STUDY AND THEN STUDY SOME MORE.

Native American Herbal Remedies
Asthma

Skunk Cabbage.
Used by the Winnebago and Dakota tribes to stimulate the removal of phlegm in asthma. The rootstock was official in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1882 when it was used in respiratory and nervous disorders and in rheumatism and dropsy.
Mullein.
Introduced by Europeans. The Menominees smoked the pulverized, dried root for respiratory complaints while the Forest Potawatomis, the Mohegans, and the Penobscots smoked the dried leaves to relieve asthma. The Catawba Indians used a sweetened syrup from the boiled root, which they gave to their children for coughs.
Backache
Arnica.
The Catawba Indians used a tea of arnica roots for treating back pains. The Dispensary of the United States (22nd edition) states this drug can be dangerous if taken internally and that it has caused severe and even fatal poisoning. Also used as a wash to treat sprains and bruises.
Gentian.
The Catawba Indians steeped the roots in hot water and applied the hot fluid on aching backs.
Horsemint.
The Catawba tribe crushed and steeped fresh horsemint leaves in cold water and drank the infusion to allay back pain. Other tribes used horsemint for fever, inflammation, and chills.
Bronchitis
Creosote Bush.
A tea of the leaves was used for bronchial and other respiratory problems.
Pleurisy Root.
The Natchez drank a tea of the boiled roots as a remedy for pneumonia and was later used to promote the expulsion of phlegm,
Wormwood.
The Yokia Indians of Mendocino County used a tea of the boiled leaves of a local species of wormwood to cure bronchitis.
Burns
Yellow-Spined Thistle.
The Kiowa Indians boiled yellow-spined thistle blossoms and applied the resulting liquid to burns and skin sores.
Childbirth
To Speed Childbirth:
Partridgeberry.
The Cherokee used a tea of the boiled leaves. Frequent doses of the tea were taken in the few weeks preceding the expected date of delivery.
Blue Cohosh.
To promote a rapid delivery, an infusion of the root in warm water was drunk as a tea for several weeks prior to the expected delivery date.

To Speed Delivery of the Placenta:
American Licorice.
A tea was made from the boiled roots.
Broom Snakeweed.
Navajo women drank a tea of the whole plant to promote the expulsion of the placenta.

To Stop Post-Partum Hemorrhage:
Buckwheat.
Hopi women were given an infusion of the entire buckwheat plant to stop bleeding.
Black Western Chokecherry.
Arikara women were given a drink of the berry juice to stop bleeding.
Smooth Upland Sumac.
The Omahas boiled the smooth upland sumac fruits and applied the liquid as an external wash to stop bleeding.

To relieve the Pain of Childbirth:
Wild Black Cherry.
Cherokee women were given a tea of the inner bark to relieve pain in the early stages.
Cotton.
The Alabama and Koasati tribes made a tea of the roots of the plant to relieve the pains of labor.
Colds
Boneset.
Boneset tea was one of the most frequently used home remedies during the last century. The Menominees used it to reduce fever; the Alabamas, to relive stomachache; the Creeks, for body pain; the Iroquois and the Mohegans, for fever and colds.
Colic
Catnip.
The Mohegans made a tea of catnip leaves for infant colic.
Contraceptives
Ragleaf Bahia.
The Navajos, who called the Ragleaf bahia herb twisted medicine, drank a tea of the roots boiled in water for thirty minutes for contraception purposes.
Indian Paintbrush.
Hopi women drank a tea of the whole Indian paintbrush to "Dry up the menstrual flow."
Blue Cohosh.
Chippewa women drank a strong decoction of the powdered blue cohosh root to promote parturition and menstruation.
Dogbane.
Generally used by many tribes, a tea from the boiled roots of the plant was drunk once a week.
Milkweed.
Navajo women drank a tea prepared of the whole plant after childbirth.
American Mistletoe.
Indians of Mendocino County drank a tea of the leaves to induce abortion or to prevent conception.
Antelope Sage.
To prevent conception, Navajo women drank one cup of a decoction of boiled antelope sage root during menstruation.
Stoneseed.
Shoshoni women of Nevada reportedly drank a cold water infusion of stoneseed roots everyday for six months to ensure permanent sterility.
Coughs
Aspen.
The Cree Indians used an infusion of the inner bark as a remedy for coughs.
Wild Cherry.
The Flambeau Ojibwa prepared a tea of the bark of wild cherry for coughs and colds, while other tribes used a bark for diarrhea or for lung troubles.
White Pine.
The inner bark was used by Indian people as a tea for colds and coughs.
Sarsaparilla.
The Penobscots pulverized dried sarsaparilla roots and combined them with sweet flag roots in warm water and used the dark liquid as a cough remedy.
Diabetes
Wild Carrot.
The Mohegans steeped the blossoms of this wild species in warm water when they were in full bloom and took the drink for diabetes.
Devil’s Club.
The Indians of British Columbia utilized a tea of the root bark to offset the effects of diabetes.
Diarrhea
Blackcherry.
A tea of blackberry roots was the most frequently used remedy for diarrhea among Indians of northern California.
Wild Black Cherry.
The Mohegans allowed the ripe wild black cherry to ferment naturally in a jar about one year than then drank the juice to cure dysentery.
Dogwood.
The Menominees boiled the inner bark of the dogwood and passed the warm solution into the rectum with a rectal syringe made from the bladder of a small mammal and the hollow bone of a bird.
Geranium.
Chippewa and Ottawa tribes boiled the entire geranium plant and drank the tea for diarrhea.
White Oak.
Iroquois and Penobscots boiled the bark of the white oak and drank the liquid for bleeding piles and diarrhea.
Black Raspberry.
The Pawnee, Omaha, and Dakota tribes boiled the root bark of black raspberry for dysentery.
Star Grass.
Catawbas drank a tea of star grass leaves for dysentery.
Digestive Disorders
Dandelion.
A tea of the roots was drunk for heartburn by the Pillager Ojibwas. Mohegans drank a tea of the leaves for a tonic.
Yellow Root.
A tea from the root was used by the Catawbas and the Cherokee as a stomach ache remedy.
Fevers
Dogwood.
The Delaware Indians, who called the tree Hat-ta-wa-no-min-schi, boiled the inner bark in water, using the tea to reduce fevers.
Willow.
The Pomo tribe boiled the inner root bark, then drank strong doses of the resulting tea to induce sweating in cases of chills and fever. In the south, the Natchez prepared their fever remedies from the bark of the red willow, while the Alabama and Creek Indians plunged into willow root baths for the same purpose.
Feverwort.
The Cherokees drank a decoction of the coarse, leafy, perennial herb to cure fevers.
Headache
Pennyroyal.
The Onondagas steeped pennyroyal leaves and drank the tea to cure headaches.
Heart and Circulatory Problems
Green Hellebore.
The Cherokee used the green hellebore to relive body pains.
American Hemp and Dogbane.
Used by the Prairie Potawatomis as a heart medicine, the fruit was boiled when it was still green, and the resulting decoction drunk. It was also used for kidney problems and for dropsy.
Hemorrhoids
White Oak.
The Menominee tribe treated piles by squirting an infusion of the scraped inner bark of oak into the rectum with a syringe made from an animal bladder and the hollow bone of a bird.
Inflammations and Swellings
Witch Hazel.
The Menominees of Wisconsin boiled the leaves and rubbed the liquid on the legs of tribesmen who were participating in sporting games. A decoction of the boiled twigs was used to cure aching backs, while steam derived by placing the twigs in water with hot rocks was a favorite Potawatomi treatment for muscle aches.
Influenza
Native Hemlock (as opposed Poison Hemlock of Socrates fame).
The Menominees prepared a tea if the inner bark and drank it to relieve cold symptoms. A similar tea was used by the Forest Potawatomis to induce sweating and relieve colds and feverish conditions.
Insect Bites and Stings
Fendler Bladderpod.
The Navajos made a tea and used it to treat spider bites.
Purple Coneflower.
The Plains Indians used this as a universal application for the bites and stings of all crawling, flying, or leaping bugs. Between June and September, the bristly stemmed plant, which grows in dry, open woods and on prairies, bears a striking purplish flower.
Stiff Goldenrod.
The Meskwaki Indians of Minnesota ground the flowers into a lotion and applied it to bee stings.
Trumpet Honeysuckle.
The leaves were ground by chewing and then applied to bees stings.
Wild Onion and Garlic.
The Dakotas and Winnebagos applied the crushed bulbs of wild onions and garlics.
Saltbush.
The Navajos chewed the stems and placed the pulpy mash on areas of swelling caused by ant, bee and wasp bites. The Zunis applied the dried, powdered roots and flowers mixed with saliva to ant bites.
Broom Snakeweed.
The Navajos chewed the stem and applied the resin to insect bites and stings of all kinds.
Tobacco.
A favorite remedy for bee stings was the application of wet tobacco leaves.
Insect Repellents and Insecticides
Goldenseal.
The Cherokee pounded the large rootstock with bear fat and smeared it on their bodies as an insect repellent. It was also used as a tonic, stimulant, and astringent.
Rheumatism
Pokeweed.
Indians of Virginia drank a tea of the boiled berries to cure rheumatism. The dried root was also used to allay inflammation.
Bloodroot.
A favorite rheumatism remedy among the Indians of the Mississippi region - the Rappahannocks of Virginia drank a tea of the root.
Sedatives
Wild Black Cherry.
The Meskwaki tribe made a sedative tea of the root bark.
Hops.
The Mohegans prepared a sedative medicine from the conelike strobiles and sometimes heated the blossoms and applied them for toothache. The Dakota tribe used a tea of the steeped strobiles to relieve pains of the digestive organs, and the Menominee tribe regarded a related species of hops as a panacea.
Wild Lettuce.
Indigenous to North American, it was used for sedative purposes, especially in nervous complaints.
Thrush
Geranium.
The Cherokee boiled geranium root together with wild grape, and with the liquid, rinsed the mouths of children affected with thrush.
Persimmon.
The Catawba stripped the bark from the tree and boiled it in water, using the resulting dark liquid as a mouth rinse.

Sources: Millspaugh, Charles F. American Medicinal Plants. NY: Dover Publications, 1974.
Mooney, James. Myths of the Cherokee and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees. Nashville TN: Charles and Randy Elders, Publishers, 1982.
Weiner, Michael. Earth Medicine Earth Food. NY: Fawcett Columbine, 1980.
Love like there is no tomorrow!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5463

  • goodyguy
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texastee2007 wrote:
I do to...I have followed natural healing since 1978. The more I learn...the more I want to learn. I start my Cherokee language class in January...

O-si-yo Wi-gi,

O-s-da-du o-gi-na-li !

GG~
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5467

  • texastee2007
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Osiyo

U ne la nv hi u da do li s di
Love like there is no tomorrow!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5468

  • goodyguy
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texastee2007 wrote:
Osiyo

U ne la nv hi u da do li s di

God's blessings to you too, Wi gi!

Da ni s ta yo hi hv!

GG~
Last Edit: 6 years 6 months ago by goodyguy.
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5534

  • scubasmitty
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IF YOU ARE IN FLA,,,,BE AFRAID,,VERY AFRAID !!!



Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to be Released in the US for the First Time
December 23, 2011
Print Version
By Mike Barrett
Activist Post

To those of you who have been eager to hear the latest news concerning the potential release of genetically modified mosquitoes – here it is.

It turns out that the genetically modified mosquitoes could be released into the U.S. environment as early as January of 2012.

A private firm plans to initiate the release of the GE mosquitoes in the Florida Keys. Florida will be the first beta testing grounds to determine whether or not the mosquitoes lead to detrimental environmental and genetic impact. Residents in this area will also be subjected — without choice — to these genetically manipulated insects, unless the private firm decides to seek permission.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes — An Unknown Dangerous Experiment
The first mosquito release took place in the Cayman Islands in the Caribbean in 2009. On Sunday, October 27, the release was discussed in a scientific paper by the journal of Nature Biotechnology with the report concluding the release’s success.

A second trial occurred in 2010, where 6,000 mosquitoes were released in Malaysia for further experiments. The mosquitoes are genetically modified with a gene designed to kill them unless given an antibiotic known as tetracycline. Offspring of the GM mosquitoes will receive this same lethal gene which will kill the offspring before it can ever reach adulthood. As more genetically modified mosquitoes mate with wild mosquitoes, the idea is that more and more offspring will be produced with the lethal gene, thereby reducing the mosquito population.

Of course the risks these mosquitoes pose both on the environment, as well as the health of all living creatures are highly unknown, leaving everyone with many more questions than answers. We have already seen how terribly genetic modification can threaten the environment and human health, yet people are still moving toward a genetically modified world.

With the release of genetically modified insects could come the downfall of both local and global ecosystems as well as negative consequences concerning the food chain. There is simply no way of knowing what could happen by replacing the naturally born life forms on planet earth with genetically modified creations.

Some questions that still remain unanswered:

Will Oxitec, the creator of the insects, need to acquire the free and informed consent of residents in Key West for the release of the GM mosquitoes? With the previous release of the mosquitoes in the Cayman Islands there was no public consultation taken on potential risks and informed consent was not given from locals.
With 0.5 percent of the released insects being female (the gender which bites humans), what happens to humans if bitten by the female mosquitoes?
What could happen to the ecosystem and local food chain with the major decrease in the Aedes aegypti mosquito population?
Who will regulate the release, and who will be responsible in the event of complications – to any degree?
If Florida and the US approves Oxitec’s planned release of these genetically modified mosquitoes, we will become that much closer to future genetic modification of living creatures as well as the potential collapse of environmental and human health.

Luckily, judging by the widespread opposition of genetically modified foods, it is likely that this experiment won’t turn into a reality without a fight.

DON'T MESS WITH MOTHER NATURE.....LIFE WILL FIND A WAY...THE IGNORANCE OF MAN NEVER CEASES TO AMAZE ME .... :X
IN ORDER TO SUCCEED ACT AS IF IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO FAIL !!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5537

  • texastee2007
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OH GREAT....what fool thought of this?
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5541

  • scubasmitty
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YOUR EVER LOVING GOVERNMENT !
IN ORDER TO SUCCEED ACT AS IF IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO FAIL !!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5542

  • JudyH
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texastee2007 wrote:
....hey we could talk about things together Judy and no one will know what we are saying unless they have the decoder ring...LOL !

goodyguy wrote:
texastee2007 wrote:
I do to...I have followed natural healing since 1978. The more I learn...the more I want to learn. I start my Cherokee language class in January...
O-si-yo Wi-gi,
O-s-da-du o-gi-na-li !

GG~


:ohmy: Uh oh Tee, this means we can't talk about GG in Cherokee.....do you know pig latin?

oodyGay uyGay ocksRay!! :P
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5543

  • texastee2007
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I tell you this...they all need fired. Don't do their job...fire them....don't show up everyday....pull their pensions and fire them....do stupid things like this....pull their pensions and fire them...
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5544

  • scubasmitty
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YEAH ,,,LET ME KNOW HOW THAT GO'S---things won't change till sheeple wake up !
IN ORDER TO SUCCEED ACT AS IF IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO FAIL !!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5545

  • texastee2007
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How correct you are...they are all in cahoots together.
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5549

  • WhiteFeather
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:woohoo: Them gals scared me for a minute. Then I saw the word was "pensions". Whew! :woohoo:
Count your Blessings but Remember your Dreams!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5554

  • texastee2007
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I sent you a pretty one.
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5557

  • WhiteFeather
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B) Pension? Oh you mean Dancing Girl. Yes, I saw it but I don't think my wife will let me keep her. :laugh:
Count your Blessings but Remember your Dreams!
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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5596

  • texastee2007
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a man that is our neighbor uses old oil to heat his shop...today he had his two boys with him and it is snowing outside....they grabbed gas instead of old oil and it got on their clothing and set it on fire...all three had their clothing on fire...on boy took off running outside and found out that stop, drop and roll didn
t work....the man and one son were able to get out of their cloths and almost beat the other boy black and blue putting him out....they brought him over and his clothing smelled so badly with gas it was almost nauseating...I stretched him out on my couch and started the burn treatment I have had to use many times here as the hospital is almost 30 miles away. I cut leaves off my aloe plant and scrape it into a bowl...mix lemon juice and honey in the bowl till it is a nice slurry. I also use coconut oil as well as tea.
This was a first to third degree burn.

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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 6 months ago #5597

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Re: A little Cherokee Medicine 6 years 2 months ago #7909

  • Unicorn
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Tex you don't know how good it is to see you posting on herbal medicines. I have sure missed you and your great advice I will be reading thru this thread to catch up as soon as I finally find my way around. In fact I have a funny feeling that I may have already posted a reply to this thread. :blink:


'U'
it's never too late
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